About your Search

20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
were starting to notice senior advisers all the way down. i remember talking to john dell staccato. he is the d so he was a consultant and he was saying what inspired him about this footage was needless stuff we have been shooting but senator obama had reported a birthday message to a staffer just because they weren't able to be on the trail and he wanted to make sure that she would have a happy birthday. i don't know if she did i don't know but after seeing it, this was so cool and authentic a wonderfully get to videos like this incorporating the backstage element into more visual media so the hybrid of this plus the standard commercial ended up being like the austin caucus spot i believe is what it was written as. and we did tons of these because we like liked this so much. >> are we ready now? >> the next president of the united states, barack obama. >> we have got a chance to make history in january 3. be a part of it. make showed to show up to caucus. let's go change the world. [applause] nice t-shirt. >> given enough time on camera any person who deals with it, this is a great ex
dealt with the commerce clause issue yes, five of them including john roberts said it exceeds the bet exceeds the power because it is so unusual. in other words they didn't cast down a month to meet the among the president's. they gave congress the power under the understanding of the commerce clause so there is a sense in which it me be one of to the of the calls could be more important but we just don't know. we will have to see. so, my time is up and i am really sorry that i had to do my signing before because i had to catch a plane so i won't see you at the signing table but thank you very much for coming. [applause] said that even a part of the 2011 national book festival here in washington, d.c.. to find out more, visit loc.gov/bookfest. jeffrey to the reports on the relationship which in the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author exam of the recent addition of the four justices in the past five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on the numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] thank you. hello
, remember? [laughter] geek out for appointments because chief justice warren left. john hartman and hugo black left. they were replaced by richard nixon with chief justice warren burger, harry blackmun, powell, and william rehnquist. and as you think about that list, it illustrates a theme that a think, it's a very important part of "the oath" but it is the theme of american politics over the past generation. and that is the evolution of the republican party. it is the most important story in american politics. it is the most important story in the supreme court. because modern republicans dominate the supreme court for two generations, and moderate republicans are gone. they are gone at the supreme court. they are gone in the united states congress. arlen specter as you all know is fighting for his life now. i had the privilege of covering senator specter who is a great character. often during his long tenure in the senate, and he left the republican party literally, but republican party had left him well before that. and as you look at nixon's appointments to the supreme court, 1970, t
nominee for president in 2012. governor john said, when and why did you leave the republican party and become a libertarian? >> you know, i've probably been a libertarian my entire life. this is just kind of coming out of the closet. i don't think i am unlike most americans. i think there's a lot more americans in this country that declare themselves libertarians as opposed to voting libertarian. so the picture and trying to make right now is vote libertarian with me this one time. give me a shot at changing things. and if it does somewhere, you can always return to tyranny and i'm going to argue that so so we have right now. >> what are the seven principles of good government you read about? >> one as being reality-based. just find out what his wife, base your decision inactions i'm not. make sure everybody that knows -- that should know what you're doing, knows what you're doing, so communicate. don't hesitate to deliver bad news. there's always time to fix things. if you don't have a job you love enough to get richer job done, quit and get one that she do that. it elledge mistak
hear what he said. all of a sudden is to me there would changed voice turned harsh, john muscles tighten soaring toward a chris endo, swinging his arms, and then the storm will pass. [applause] the sun would return. the jurors would relax. congeal engaging. he never addressed juries, he said carries but to them. it was all about contact. very important to american legal proceeding and history. judges and prosecutors do their duty. they were there to exact vengeance and to safeguard property. but darrow believed that juror's commit given the opportunity and a skillful enough invitation could be persuaded to look past the legal particular, judge defendant in the context of his time, situational factors that prompt behavior. he sought to make even the most serious of crimes comprehensible he talked about human beings and the difficulties of life and the futility of human planning, the misfortunes of the accused, the strange workings of fate and chance that had landed this porcelain trouble. he would try to make the jury understands not so much the case as the defendant, and it was n
. >> primarily senator old ridge was the only one not a banker. he was spearheading. >> the father-in-law to john rockefeller. >> he is tied in closely with the banking industry and the industrial complex. a wealthy guy in his own right. probably the most political figure in the united states short of the president who was wood row will sob in those days. the rest guys are bankers and they represented the din city of jpmorgan and the rockefeller dynasty. they had connections. they were connectioned to the roth childs in england. and max there. there was. he had connections to the brother max who was the head of the banks that banking consortium in germany and the nether land. we have a international group here, really. representing international people. and it was the e peed my of the bad bankers of the world theeps were quites. what happened is they knew that there was going to be a move to control banking. they knew that congress was going to pass some kind of haw to regulate banking. instead of being stupid and sitting back and saying i hope they don't too bad. they decided to take the lead. t
with john connally, governor of texas and his wife, once the sweetheart of the university of texas and still a very beautiful woman. the car behind them is a heavily armored secret service car with agents standing on the running boards and with automatic rifles down between the seats and the third car is lyndon johnson's car. he is writing in the back, right side. lady bird in the center and in the senator from texas on the left. in the front is a secret service man named rufus yarborough. johnson's cars in the motorcade of thousands of books have been written about the assassination. they concentrate on what happened to jack kennedy. not one went into detail in what i considered an adequate way, substantial detail about what was happening to lyndon johnson. what was happening from his point of view. the assassination had never been told from johnson's point of view. it came to me when i was doing this book that we have to do that. how do you do that? first you interview people who are still alive. john connolly himself is very helpful to me. he had this great ranch in south texas with a sta
. >> "eminent outlaws" is published. go ahead caller. >> caller: i wanted to know if john is still writing. john reggie. he had a book that got a lot of attention oh, back in the 50s, it was called the city is of night. has he done anything recently? >> he is still writing. he is still working and living in l.a. i cannot remember the last titles that he di .. book is city of night, which was published in the early 1960s, really important book. he later did, what we got to see, numbers, and he did a number called a sexual outlaw, which is kind of one of the influxes from my title, "eminent outlaws." it combines the title from the administration and the sexual outlaw by john reggie. the more recent work isn't as strong as his early work. >> christopher, christopher barm, are a lot of gay writer's political? >> guest: i think they are whether they want to be or not. they didn't know that they have no choice. some are more political than others. larry kramer is a case in point. some people say he is one, politics is more important to him in than good prose, but is very committed to politics. tony ku
only been in office decouple years there is already rumors of the vice presidential candidate for john kerry. apparently vilsack and the staff went to secretary of agriculture they thought they were both interviewed but she said she was not abetted by the campaign. here is a democrat they forgot they had more democrats but the press does not have historical memory so this was an anomaly father with the ohio connection she captured the national attention very quickly and with showcase her at conventions but by 2008 she was a serious contender for price president pro when she endorsed obama that also moved up her stock. she was one of the last three or four people obama was considering. there were things against her. she is not an exciting speaker. it was not a bill clinton's speech. very measured. levying off of the teleprompter. saw lead information off the cuff she is different. she is savaged with the press and i actually brought up clip of jonge to work -- jon stewart on "the daily show" lampooning the speech she gave in response to the president bush "state of the union." it was no
>> thank you, john. in nevada school districts recently laid off seven teachers a year. some of the best teachers for classroom. in michigan, school districts are spending over a quarter of their budget on retirement benefits. and in wisconsin, property taxes went up every year for the past decade. why? the answer can be summed up in two words, government unions. unions use their power to press government to put their interests first. in contract negotiations unions always insist on seniority-based layouts and this gives guaranteed job security to senior members. but it also means the school districts are forced to lay off the new hires first even if those teachers are star performers. parents object but the unions have decided they can accept that. the unions also want understandably bear generation retirement benefits for their members. in michigan 27% of school districts budgets provide pensions and health benefits and it's not hard to see what. is a state can retire after 25 years on the job and collect full benefits i have a lot of teachers retire in their late 40s or ea
tv.org. >> michael brick recounts in academic year at john h. reagan high school in texas and profiles the school's principal, anabel garza, and many teachers, students and staff. the author recounts the school's new closure in 2008 and its subsequent turnaround. this is about 45 minutes. .. >> i just can't thank you all enough, those of you, you know who i'm talking to for letting me into your lives and havi the courage to share this story with the world. you wouldn't know it to look over here, but public education is our most pressing political, social and moral problem. everybody knows it, and positions are entrenched, and there's a lot of hot rhetoric on all sides. somehow we've gotten to a point where frustration has built to such a fever pitch, that we've turned on teachers as the villains and started shutting down schools all over the country. as a writer after a good story to tell, i went looking in the pressure cooker of a public high school working against the clock to raise test scores. i wanted to take a look at what we're throwing away in this big national purge. instead, i found a d
it this spring in the health care case. john marshall famously declared that is what the power and the duty of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have a standing at one its jurisdiction. that's another thing the court basically made up. other courts won't necessarily have that. a few years ago to give very interesting kind of judicial trip to south africa which is a fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african constitution gives people all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no l
that there is a war going on, not just in the democratic party, but the republican perhaps much more intense. john boehner is trying to work a deal with the president to do tax reform and entitlement reform and his deputy, the majority leader, calls people like paul ryan, who is now running for vice president. .. >> if you keep doing this, you are going to risk your speakership. the president said when i talked to him, interestingly enough, he said in fixing -- he realizes the magnitude of all of this, as does speaker boehner, key democrats, key republicans realize what it is. and the president literally said to me, i would willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing
to 1977. legislative assistant to senator john denver from 1979 to 81. from 81-82 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and is chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals in district of columbia circuit and 1990 and president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 203rd 1991. please welcome justice thomas and professor mark to the stage. [applause] >> thank you, ladies and tennant love for that extra nearly gracious, warm welcome. thank you for the national archives and the staff for making this event possible. thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitutional accountability center and thank you, justice thomas and off for being with us today as we mark the 225th birthday of our constitution. i guess i would like to start that conversation with the words the constitution starts with. we, the people. what that phrase means to you, how that freeze has changed over time thanks to the amendment
john cline was the president of cnn and said we will put you on tv right now. i was overwhelmed. the first time i did not know what i was supposed to be. then i found my center i was supposed to me me. it was like landing in russia up. a culture shock. i learned a lot about myself and people with their consumption of the news. >> on the topic of wealth and the source for learning do you think we have that level of wealth people would still have a thirst for learning? the field that is mess it -- missing there has never been a society we have been consumed i remember growing up iacocca said quality is job born now we make nothing. if you complain about something i complained about delta air lines. [laughter] you used to be able to complain dominos 30 minutes or its free. there was a level of pride and commitment. you have to work twice as hard to go have as far. even though you felt it would be hard but it was for the truth but i don't think we tell people what is expected. terrorist attack the country and they said go shopping than wait to. they're past be a place you're not it
whatever weapons we can. >> thank you, john. let's give john wohlstetter i hand. [applause] .. whenever it is you are watching i appreciate that. always told by my wife and daughter after presenting some earlier remarks, i should make it much shorter which i will try to do. my hope is to talk for about 15, no longer than 20 minutes and reserve a lot of time for the questions and commentss and counterarguments that not only do eyes the suspect some of you have but i know given some people in this room i know without a shadow of a doubt i welcome. this is, we are told, the most important election in our lifetime and it may be that more people believe that this year than believe in 2008-2004-2004 another election where that is regularly said. for this to be true, among other things elections must have genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. we could have separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy but let me say my primary interest in the book and my remarks this evening
that we think that as americans, not as republicans or democrats, that as americans, -- john and i were on appropriations together. why are their partisan issues? job is to get data and call witnesses are dead what you have partisan shaping us. why do you have leaders getting to choose who gets to sit on what committee in exchange for promising to go along with the party lines? why do we allow that to happen? well, the first part is the easy part. you can change the laws about primaries and you can change the laws about redistricting. in order to change the internal workings and the rules of congress, who can be the speaker, who and how a speaker can act. the only way to do it is to do what you are all doing tonight. when you are a congressman or senator or state legislature, show up at a meeting, be there and demand that they change. so many members of congress, the number of members of congress who vote with their party 95% of the time. if you build your party 95% of the time, you're not voting with your brain. you are not voting with your constituents. you are voting with your party.
answered that. it was congressman john lewis. when we finished talking, i decided to check my text messages because i couldn't keep voice mail clear enough to keep getting messages, and low and behold, there was a message from the white house saying the president was trying to reach me. i called the number, and they wanted to arrange the call so -- interesting these people in the media, the person who was in the car with me from cnn started going in her purse to pull out a cam corder. i said you cannot tape me while i'm talking to the president. i made her turn it off, and made her put that away. [applause] he started out by saying you're a hard person to reach. well, everyone knew i'd been with cnn all week. i didn't say that to him though. [laughter] anyway, he started out saying, you know, vilsack would be calling me about a position they wanted to offer, and then he said, you know, those issues you've been putting out there all week i'm well aware of them. i said, no, you don't understand those issues the same way i do. we went back and forth. i didn't really -- you know, i'm talking to
to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami university of ohio and who is a quarterback , been in office burger of that team purpose per that shall not otherwise be named. so that's a little presidential trivia for you, and i also always give a little mix and stir when i come back. thinking to prepare my remarks when latter is being built. sandino's as well as i do. the real director of the nixon library was richard nixon. he designed and oversaw it and every detail was of interest to him. but probably the thing he was least interested in was a room which is even here anymore, the domestic policy room which has been redone. the league kind of such a together at the last minute. one of those exhibits was about the endangered species act. president nixon as you may or may not know, greatest of a terminal president in the history of the united states son and heir the cl
against the majority, to protect the minority against the majority. and his colleague, john jay goes one step further. shape in the first president of the constitutional congress, later supreme court justice. he said those that own the country ought to go. so i think we have to see that the origins of this kind of a monopoly capitalism go back right to the very roots of the country. >> the irony though is the system of some of his sharpest analects and critics understood is full of contradictions. it is important to be understood not to be arguing because i don't believe that, but this is a system that, for example, somehow solve this problems and presented the united states that can't be overcome, but the system is now so well defended that any hope of changing it is delusional. i don't believe that for one minute. this is a system full of all kinds of problems that it can't solve it is patently obvious. i heard it mentioned one. it doesn't want these crazies over time. these are times of trouble. in times of crisis, people are asking questions, which give opportunity for people like me
. >> you're watching booktv. >> now john wohlstetter talks about the threat of nuclear weapons today and discusses what can be done to safeguard against the ultimate catastrophe. this is about an hour. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, and thank you for joining me today, although i don't have something cheery for you. i was thinking how to start this. wasn't as nice as the very fine english historian who must've been thinking the same thing to write something in today's "wall street journal" opinion page for me, and the title of it is, let's all prepare for the cataclysm. we all think of august as a month where everybody is at the beach, sort of chilling out and all that in this heavily political season, just enjoying life. and for those of us in washington, congress is in recess, which generally speaking means a lot of lobbyists leave town so there's a lot less traffic. it's a rather nice time. robbers wanted to bring us back to a little historical reality, so over the last century among the peaceful events that have occurred, in august of 1914 world war i began. on the last
of the conley, john con le's children, conley was the governor of texas. he was wounded. no one knew how seriously at the time, and she went to comfort them. lucy bird was in high school in washington, and if i have this right, she was taken out of class and brought back to the johnson home in washington. >> host: next call for robert caro, cici in portland, oregon. hi. >> caller: hi. i enjoyed your talk. one of the conversations in the talk was about the seven democrats, and i wondered if you could elaborate on the movement towards the republican party after the passage of the civil rights. all of us heard about johnson's quote, i think i just lost the south permanently, the democratic party has, and so i was wondering, then, if you could talk about -- if he, as a political practices, knew that through the passage of the civil rights bills that the south would be lost from the democratic party permanently or, you know, prior to it actually happening and how he was trying to get the bill passed, and he realized that vote would be lost at that time, do you think? >> guest: you have the ca
on by people in silicon valley such as bill gates. >> here's a little taste of donald luskin's, i am john galt, today's heroic innovators building the world and the villainous parasites destroying it. this is booktv. .. >> they operate danced is will not because of the lands it occupied but attacked because of the values and the values of democracy is getting to be interesting but we do follow it with those american values. sometimes too much. you'll find people putting the israeli flag with the american flag. i do not like it. why do people do it? because of democracy and value of the american people. even though we love america we are not america. if you make a mistake you pay a price that you are able to correct it. and we see in the past decisions you do not have to satisfy anyone to the american president word to the un we do not agree with you. if we don't do it but first in the early '80s deciding to attack the nuclear reactor in iraq not popular in the u.s. but we did it and we were condemned by the state department and the when years later people appreciated that decision that he took
she did. i told -- couldn't even talk. i feel fine. john breaux and blood coming out, i feel fine. and sergeant kuhn comes up and tasered me right away. he is letting me up. i could feel the blood coming out of my mouth. how do you feel now? i couldn't say anything. he told me to run. ago to? and i'm going to run. i am looking for a clearing and when i see clearance between the hyundai and the police officer what i'd do is i get up to go run but this leg when this land was in front of me i didn't know it was broke so the leg when out. when i fell down and looked -- able to make the camera looks like i was going after it because my hands were like this but i was trying to get my hands in front of me. >> host: the video still wasn't running. >> guest: that is when the video had been running maybe 15 seconds. it caught that. what it didn't catch was them name calling and the taser, the juice running 50,000 volts through my body. he did that in three shots and discharge all three shots. when he was doing that these guys are beating me with a baton and telling me to stay still. no way
is that i'm professor of american foreign policy at the johns hopkins school of advanced international studies in washington. we teach graduate students. i have wonderful students from all over the world. students come from all over the world to study here because this is america, and they know that there is something special about america, and we wrote this book to try to make sure that in the future, students from all over the world and people and entrepreneurs and immigrants from all over the world will continue to come here, that this will remain a special place. >> host: tom, is, of course, the "new york times" columnist, pulitzer prize winner three times. how did you team up? >> guest: we're old friends and neighbors and we called each other and talked about the world, but we noticed something in recent years. we started talking about the world, but we ended every day talking about america. it was apparent to us that america, its future and vitality is the biggest foreign policy issue in the world. that's how we wrote the book together. >> host: "that used to be us" is the name o
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)